What does Phoebus mean in Romeo and Juliet?

What does Phoebus mean in Romeo and Juliet?

What does Phoebus mean in Romeo and Juliet?

Phoebus is the sun god who rides across the sky in his golden chariot pulled by a team of horses. Juliet urges Phoebus to speed to his nighttime lodgings. She wishes that Phoebus' reckless son Phaethon were driving the chariot so that night would arrive sooner.

Who said Gallop apace you fiery-footed steeds towards Phoebus lodging?

Juliet Juliet: Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, Towards Phoebus' lodging: such a waggoner As Phaethon would whip you to the west, And bring in cloudy night immediately.

Who said Blistered be thy tongue For such a wish he was not born to shame?

Romeo Shame on Romeo! 95 Blistered be thy tongue For such a wish! He was not born to shame.

Who said Blistered be thy tongue?

The Nurse : Shame come to Romeo! Juliet : [scurrying to her feet] Blistered be thy tongue for such a wish! He was not born for shame! Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit!

What does Phoebus Lodging represent?

 The “fiery-footed steeds” (line 1) are Phoebus's horses. What does “Phoebus' lodging” represent?  Going to “Phoebus' lodging” (line 2) represents where the golden sun sets in the west.

What does Phoebus Lodging mean?

In Act III, Scene II, when Juliet says, "Gallop apace, you fiery-footed steeds, / Towards Phoebus' lodging," she is using Greek mythology to express her eagerness for the day to pass and for night to fall so that her wedding night can take place (1-2).

What does Romeo think is worse than death?

Why, according to Romeo, is banishment worse than death? Banishment is worse than death because he doesn't know anyone and he won't get to see Juliet any more. Explain Romeo's pun involving "flies."

What does Juliet mean when she says Villain and he be many miles asunder?

Therefore, Juliet's aside later in Scene 5 of Act 3 shows us that she is remaining steadfast in her conviction to continue to trust Romeo, which we see in her line, "Villain and he be many miles asunder," meaning that the term "villain" cannot justly be applied to describe Romeo's character (III. v.

Why does Juliet use so many oxymorons?

These oxymorons serve to illustrate Juliet's inner conflict. She is madly in love with Romeo, but she is angry and shocked that he killed someone whom she cares about. She has no notion of the context of the fight, either (that Romeo killed Tybalt to avenge Mercutio), so confusion also plays a part in her reaction.

What does Juliet see that frightens her?

Why does Lord Capulet want Juliet to marry Paris? ... As Romeo leave, Juliet has a feeling of doom, what does she see that frightens her? she sees Romeo lying dead at the bottom of a tomb. Lady Capulet tells Juliet that in order to get revenge for Tybalt's death, she will do what?

Where is Hotel Le Phoebus Garden in Gruissan?

  • Set along a leisure pond in Gruissan, Hotel Le Phoebus Garden is located 0.6 mi from Grazel beach and a 5-minute walk from the port. The property offers a spa center with a steam room, sauna, heated benches and an infinity hot tub, a pool and a children's pool. Free WiFi and free public parking are available.

How is Phoebus related to the Greek god Apollo?

  • (III.ii.1-4) Phoebus is an allusion to Apollo, the Greek god of the sun (among other things). In myth, Apollo is depicted as driving a chariot (Phaeton) that controls the rising and setting of the sun. In this early part of her monologue, Juliet wishes for the sun to set and the night to arrive.

Where does Juliet make the allusion to Phoebus?

  • At the start of Act III, scene ii, Juliet delivers a soliloquy. In the first few lines of that speech, she makes an allusion to Phoebus: Toward Phoebus' lodging. Such a wagoner And bring in cloudy night immediately. (III.ii.1-4) Phoebus is an allusion to Apollo, the Greek god of the sun (among other things).

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